Holograms are cool. And despite the sophistication of the human eye, holography, which has been around since the 1800’s, is still something that manages to dazzle. Today, thanks to the internet, we are able to easily recreate these photographic ghosts that magically hover for educational purposes. Cue in middle school maths / science teacher Riley Laird who also leads a film studies elective and was transitioning from 2D to 3D effects in film.

As it turns out Mark McElroy and myself happened to be working on building a prism that makes much of this magic possible (see video below)

After a few prototypes and finding solutions for making our own video to project, Riley Laird decided to take this internet trend to task and have her students each build one of their own.

As part of a historical survey on special effects, students dove into the finer details and applied what they learned from the construction of their prism to create a cinematic shorts. Going beyond gimmicks, these holograms helped to elicit student engagement, creativity and allowed students to make their own connections to the content.

The process of building, trouble shooting and then refining our own holograms has given way to a number of student created videos and vlogs where they have gone on to explore their own curiosities on the subject

If you would like more information on holograms, how to build one, or ways to use them in class, just ask @mcerlroy23, @4lexgutierrez or @rileylaird

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